Jack Smith Glass

Craftsmanship, Service & Competitive Prices since 1962.

Glossary of Terms

Serving homeowners and businesses in Sonoma County

Glossary

AAMA
American Architectural Manufacture’s Association – a voluntary association of manufacturers which sets quality standards for windows and other architectural products. Standards to meet AAMA:
Resistance to air infiltration
Resistance to water leakage
Structural adequacy to withstand wind loads
Forced entry

AIR INFILTRATION
The amount of air that passes through a window vent and perimeter frame, or a door panel and perimeter frame. Standards are set by AAMA for the amount of air infiltration allowed in a window or door.

AIR SPACE
The distance between two panes of glass in an insulated unit

ANNEALED GLASS
The basic glass type produced in the float process of making glass. Annealed glass, when compared with the same thickness and type of tempered glass, is weaker.

ANODIZE
An electro-chemical process used to coat aluminum with a naturally durable protective coating. The material is electronically charged to “toast” the metal.

ARGON
An inert, harmless gas injected into the insulated glass airspace to help reduce heat loss.

BLOCK FRAME
Refers to a window or door nail-on frame whose fins (flanges) have been removed.

BRICK MOLDING
A standard milled wood trim piece to cover the gap between the window or door frame and masonry, or as a decorative trim with other siding types.

BRONZE ANODIZED
Aluminum extrusions which are bronze anodized in color

BRONZE GLASS
A solar tinted glass used in the exterior lite of an insulating unit in order to cut glare and ultraviolet damage to the interior, while increasing the unit’s shading coefficient.

BTU
An abbreviation for British Thermal Unit, commonly shown as BTU; the heat required to increase the temperature of one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit, about the amount of heat generated from burning one wood match.

CLADDING
A material fastened on the exterior face of a window to provide ease of maintenance, and a durable, low maintenance exterior surface. (E.g. vinyl; extruded or roll-formed aluminum)

CLEAR GLASS
Also known as “clear annealed.” This glass allows: natural colors to show without distortion, maximum light transmissions into structure, and optimized solar heating for maximum heat gain. It can be tempered for use where safety glass is required and it is available in single strength – 2.5mm, double strength – 3mm (1/8”) 4mm (3/16”) and ¼”

CONDENSATION
Water vapor from the air deposited on any cold surface which has a temperature below the dew point. In glass units, it appears between two lites of glass when there is a seal failure.

CRAFTSMAN GRIDS
Creates the look of individual panes of glass on the interior of fiberglass windows, leaving the exterior easier to clean.

DAYLIGHT OPENING (DLO)
This term refers to the area of a window or an insulated unit that allows the most amount of unobstructed daylight to pass or see through. For example, glass that is 1/8” clear over 1/8” clear has a transmission rate of 82%.

DOUBLE GLAZING
The use of two panes of glass in a window to increase energy efficiency and provide other performance benefits. May or may not refer to an insulating glass unit.

DOUBLE-STRENGTH GLASS (DS)
Sheet glass between 0.115 and 0.133 inches thick (3 to 3.38mm). 1/8” or B grade glass.

DUAL GLAZED (UNIT)
Equivalent to twin-glazed insulating glass. Also know as double-glazed, insulated glass, thermal pans, thermal glazed, etc.

EGRESS
The act of leaving an enclosed space. In the building industry, all bedrooms must have an Egress window or door that meets code.

EGRESS CODE
The standards set by the Uniform Building Code (UBC) which delineate the openings in sleeping areas in order to provide an emergency exit. Section 1204 of the 1991 UBC requires the following minimums for windows in residential sleeping areas unless the room has an exterior door. For example:
Minimum net clear opening of 5.7 square feet
Minimum net height opening of 24 inches
Minimum net width opening of 20 inches
Maximum finished sill height from the floor of 44 inches
In order to be designated an egress window; all of the above criteria must be met
NOTE: Local code may supersede these code requirements

EGRESS HINGE
A casement hinge that maximizes the net clear opening in a casement window to meet the UBC standards for exit.

EXTENSION JAMB (Jamb Lining, Jamb Extender)
A trim component which extends from the interior of the window frame to the interior wall. A board used to increase the depth of the jambs of a frame to fit a wall of any given thickness.

FAILED UNIT
An Insulated Unit that no longer meets the minimum performance standards, typically from moisture build-up or as a result of seal failure.

FLOAT GLASS
A fabrication process used to make flat glass by forming it in the molten stage on a bath of molten metal, usually tin. The vast majority of flat glass is now produced using this method. The term “plate” glass and “sheet” glass refer to older manufacturing methods still in limited use.

LAMINATED (safety) GLASS
Two or more sheets of glass with an inner layer of transparent plastic to which the glass adheres if broken. Used for increased safety and security, as well as sound reduction. Laminated glass is available in 7/32” thicknesses. Laminated glass virtually blocks UV light to 99% effectiveness.

LEGACY GRIDS
Creates the look of individual panes of glass on the exterior of the window, leaving the interior easier to clean

LITE
A single pane of glass. In windows and doors, a lite refers to separately framed panes of glass.

LOW EMISSIVITY GLASS (Low-E)
A coated glass product which reflects heat. The glass is covered with a thin, almost colorless metallic coating which reflects radiant heat energy, rather than allowing that energy to radiate through the glass surface. The lower the emissivity of the glass, the lower the heat transfer coefficient. It may be tempered where safety glass is required. Low-E is available in single strength 1/8”, 3/16” and ¼” thicknesses.

NAIL FIN
An accessory component or integral extension of a window or patio door frame which generally laps over the conventional stud construction and through which fasteners are driven to secure the frame in place.

NFRC
National Fenestration Rating Council: A body which has established methods for rating and certifying the energy performance of windows, patio doors and skylights.

PLATE GLASS
Flat glass, usually ¼” thick, produced by grinding and polishing to create parallel plane surfaces affording excellent vision. Although the term is still commonly used, most window glass is now made using the float process.

POLYCARBONATE
A plastic material used for glazing.

RADIATION
The transfer of heat in the form of electromagnetic waves from one separate surface to another. Low-E glass is designed to reduce this heat transfer by reflecting electromagnetic waves.

R VALUE (Thermal Resistance)
A measurement of resistance to heat loss in building materials. R-Value is the reciprocal of U value (1 divided by U-Value = R-Value) Resistance to thermal transfer or heat flow. Higher R-Value numbers indicate greater insulating value. R-Value is frequently used in the insulation industry and is the reciprocal of U-Value, which is more commonly used in the window industry.

REFLECTIVE GLASS
Window glass coated to reflect visible light and solar radiation striking the surface of the glass.

RELATIVE HEAT GAIN
An attribute which describes the total performance of the glazing with regard to thermal heat transfer (U-Value), as well as solar gain (shading coefficient). The relative heat gain predicts how much total energy will be gained through each square foot of glazing. The total heat gain through the glass for a specific set of conditions. The value is represented in BTU/hr x ft squared.

RELATIVE HUMIDITY
Weight of water vapor in the air divided y the weight of water vapor in completely saturated air at the same temperature, expressed as a percentage.

SEAMED EDGES
A smooth rounded edge on a piece of glass or mirror. This is achieved by lightly sanding the raw edge of the glass. Also know as “easing the edge”

SHADING COEFFICIENT (SC)
A measure of a window’s ability to transmit solar heat, relative to that ability for 1/8” clear glass. The lower a unit’s SC the less solar heat it transmits, and the greater it’s shading ability. It is being phased out in favor of the solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC). SC dived by .87 = SHGC

SIDE LIGHT
A window or lite of glass which is next to a door.

SINGLE GLAZED (SG)
A window or door with only one sheet or lite of glass, and is therefore not an insulated unit.

SINGLE HUNG WINDOW
A window that is similar to a double-hung window except that the top sash is stationary. Also referred to as a vertical slider.

SLOPE SILL ADAPTER
An “L” shaped extrusion used to compensate for and level a sill when it is sloped.

SOLAR BRONZE (SB)
Glass produced with a coating or tint that absorbs or reflects solar energy, thereby reducing solar gain.

SOLAR GRAY
Tinted glass, gray-blue in color. Also know as Gray Glass.

SOLAR HEAT GAIN
Heat from solar radiation that enters a building.

SOUND TRANSMISSION GLASS (STC)
A rating measuring a window’s acoustic properties or its ability to reduce sound transmission. An STC rating is determined by measuring the sound transmission over a selected range of sound frequencies. The higher the STC number, the less sound is transmitted.

STRESS CRACK (THERMAL CRACK)
A crack in the glass of an Insulated Unit caused by excessive heat or cold. Excessive heat can build up in the air space between the glass causing the air to expand and the glass to break.

TEMPERED GLASS (TG)
A safety glass strengthened through the process of heating, than rapidly cooling, creating a tensile strength that causes the glass to resist breakage, yet disintegrate into small pebble-sized particles, but not into slivers, if a break occurs. Tempered glass is a type of safety glass and is available in most glass types, colors and thickness.

TEMPERED BUG
A small symbol etched into the corner of tempered glass.

TOLERANCE
The variation of measurement allowed in the manufacture of windows and doors. In accordance with AAMA/ANSI, the tolerance for all dimensions 6 feet and under is (+/-) 1/16” and (+/-) 1/8” for those in excess of 6 feet. Milgard’s self-imposed standard is (+/-) 1/16” in both cases. No tolerance is established for diagonal measurements.

TRIM
Visible molding surrounding a window opening.

U-VALUE (BTU/HR/FT2)
The overall heat transfer rate through a combination of materials, it is measured by BTU’s (energy units) transferred per hour, per square foot, per degree of temperature difference. The lower the U-Value, the lower the heat transfer.

ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT (UV)
Invisible rays of solar radiation at the short-wavelength violet end of the spectrum. UV rays cause fading of paint finishes, carpets, and fabric, as well as discoloration of some materials.

VINYL
Generic term for polyvinylchloride or PVC, an extruded material used for window and door frames.

WEEP HOLE
Drainage holes provided on a window or door allowing water to drain from the frame to the outside.

Z-BAR
A retro-fit window, typically used in stucco applications, with an exterior flush fin as a trim piece to cover the existing frame.

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woman and child behine a window

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Just wanted to commend your staff for an excellent job on my rental at Montgomery Drive. This job was like having a day off. No Problems…!

— Charlie & Carol Dunnet
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